ABOUt

Apollo Theater Marquee

A Legacy of Culture

Where Stars are Born and Legends are Made!

About The Apollo

The Apollo is an American cultural treasure. It is a vibrant non-profit organization rooted in the Harlem community that engages people from around New York, the nation, and the world. Since 1934, The Apollo has celebrated, created, and presented work that centers Black artists and voices from across the African Diaspora. It has also been a catalyst for social and civic advocacy. Today, The Apollo is the largest performing arts institution committed to Black culture and creativity.

People enjoying an event

The Apollo is a commissioner and presenter; catalyst for new artists, audiences, and creative workforce; and partner in the projection of the African American narrative and its role in the development of American and global culture.

arrow icon
Artist on stage at Apollo Theater

The Apollo envisions a new American canon centered on contributions to the performing arts by artists of the African diaspora, in America and beyond.

arrow icon
See More
arrow icon
Historic highlights
View More
1934 — Opening Of The 125th Street Apollo Theater
Jan 26, 1934
Billed as “One of the most important theater events in the history of Harlem” (The New York Amsterdam News), The Apollo had its gala opening on January 26, 1934. The entertainment that night was “Jazz A La Carte” with Ralph Cooper, Aida Ward, Bennie Carter and His Orchestra, and many other performers. The event was an historic start to The Apollo’s lasting legacy.
1962 — James Brown Records "Live At The Apollo"
Oct 15, 1962
1992 — The Apollo Becomes A Nonprofit
Dec 04, 1992
On December 4th, 1992, The Apollo Theatre Investor Group transferred the organizational status of The Apollo to the establishment of The Apollo Theater Foundation, Inc. as a nonprofit 501c-3 organization. This effort directly galvanized the organization's landmark status and current mandate as an "uptown" cultural and civic center.
2005 — The Apollo Hosts Its First Spring Benefit
Jun 20, 2005
On June 20, 2005, The Apollo hosted its inaugural Apollo Spring Benefit: The Magic Lives On. The Spring Benefit is an annual fundraiser that continues today as the institution's largest fundraiser in support of its year-round artistic, education, and community programs.
2017 — Bruno Mars Performs Atop The Apollo’s Marquee
Nov 29, 2017
Bruno Mars became the first artist to perform in concert on top of The Apollo’s iconic marquee. The historic performance was captured live and was also the first time an Apollo event shut down 125th Street.
2024 — The Apollo Physically Expands For The First Time
Feb 09, 2024
The Apollo launched the first physical expansion in its history with the opening of The Apollo Stages at The Victoria. Located just a few steps away from the Historic Theater, The Victoria expansion was a top-to-bottom renovation and restoration of the historic building which first opened in 1914. The expansion is an exciting part in the continued evolution of The Apollo.

A HISTORY OF EXCELLENCE

Select a decade:
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
1934
  • On January 26, 1934, the 125th Street Apollo Theater opens with the show “Jazz a la Carte” headlined by Benny Carter and his Orchestra, Ralph Cooper and Aida Ward.
  • The Apollo becomes the premiere showplace for live, theatrical entertainment in Harlem.
  • Dewey “Pigmeat” Markham, Jackie “Moms” Mabley and Dusty Fletcher are among the comedians who appear regularly on stage.
  • Tap dancers like the Nicholas Brothers, Berry Brothers, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, Buck and Bubbles are the top dance acts.
  • Amateur Night winners include Ella Fitzgerald and Pearl Bailey.
  • In 1935, Bessie Smith’s four weeks at The Apollo are her sole live performances that year.
  • By 1937, The Apollo is the largest employer of Black theatrical workers in the US, according to Frank Schiffman, and the only theater in NYC hiring Black people in backstage positions.
  • Billie Holiday, Lena Horne, and the Count Basie Orchestra make their debut.
  • The Apollo Chorus Girls are considered to be the best line in NYC. In 2005, their story is recounted in the documentary “Been Rich All My Life.”

arrow iconRead More
1940
  • Lionel Hampton’s 16-piece band appears at The Apollo. Hampton’s hit, “Flyin’ Home,” becomes an Apollo favorite.
  • Teddy Hale, Babe Laurence, and Bunny Briggs are the top dance attractions.
  • During World War II, The Apollo sets aside 35 tickets daily for soldiers. Tuesdays at the USO were “Apollo Night.”
  • Dinah Washington and Sammy Davis, Jr. make their first Apollo appearance.
  • Amateur Night winners during the 1940s include Sarah Vaughn and Ruth Brown.
  • Apollo comics stop using blackface makeup.

arrow iconRead More
1950
  • The Johnny Otis Rhythm & Blues Caravan come to The Apollo featuring 13-year old Little Esther Phillips.
  • The week before Christmas 1951, Josephine Baker makes her Apollo debut.
  • “Mambo Shows” are a big Apollo attraction with stars like Tito Puente, Mongo Santamaria, and the Mambo Aces.
  • Comedy acts like “Harlem’s Son of Fun,” Nipsey Russell, Timmie Rogers & James “Stump” Cross, and Harold “Stumpy” Cromer are a major draw.
  • “The Detective Story,” with Sidney Poitier, is the first dramatic play to be shown on the stage.
  • In 1955, Thurman Ruth’s Gospel Caravan debuts at The Apollo featuring acts such as The Dixie Hummingbirds, Shirley Caesar, Alex Bradford, Clara Ward, and the Soul Stirrers.
  • Amateur Night contestants include the Esquires, Dionne Warwick, Joe Tex, and James Brown.
  • In 1955, Disc jockey Tommy “Dr. Jive” Smalls brings the idea of the Rhythm and Blues Revue to Apollo manager Bobby Schiffman. The shows feature as many as a dozen vocal acts on one bill.
  • “Showtime at The Apollo” is first broadcast in 1955, taped before a live studio audience. Performers include Sarah Vaughn, “Big” Joe Turner, Herb Jeffries, the Count Basie Orchestra, comedian Nipsey Russell, and the dancer Bill Bailey. Willie Bryant is the host.
  • Jazz greats like Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and Thelonius Monk appear at The Apollo.
arrow iconRead More
1960
  • Nancy Wilson makes her Apollo debut. The Miracles, with Smokey Robinson, appear on Ray Charles’ show.
  • A Scepter Records show package includes the Shirelles, Chuck Jackson, Tommy Hunt, Maxine Brown, and the Isley Brothers.
  • Amateur Night winners include Gladys Knight, King Curtis, Ronnie Spector, Billy Stewart, Jimi Hendrix, and Charlie and Inez Foxx.
  • The Jewel Box Revue, “25 Men and 1 Girl”, is one of the most popular shows and features performances by people in drag.
  • Sam and Dave, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Joe Tex, and especially Aretha Franklin, present the grittier side of soul at The Apollo.
  • James Brown records live shows at the Apollo in 1962.
  • The “Motortown” Revue debuts with the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, the Four Tops, Gladys Knight and the Pips, the Commodores, and “Little” Stevie Wonder.
  • “Blues Nights” features B.B. King, Bobby “Blue” Bland, T-Bone Walker, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, Jimmy Witherspoon, and Odetta.
arrow iconRead More
1970
  • Aretha Franklin’s Apollo shows are major events. The Apollo marquee reads, “She’s Home.”
  • Stars of the Philadelphia International record label, including the Delfonics, the O'Jays, the Stylistics, the Spinners, the Three Degrees and Harold Melvin, and the Blue Notes, are presented.
  • John Lennon and Yoko Ono appear at a 1971 benefit concert for Attica.
  • B.B. King plays an early morning blues concert for Harlem schoolchildren.
  • By the mid-1970s, The Apollo is presenting only 22 weeks of shows per year as recordings eclipse live performances as an important source of income for artists.
  • Bobby Schiffman reluctantly closes The Apollo in January 1976.
  • The Theater briefly reopens in 1978 under new management with shows by Ralph McDonald, War, the T-Connection and Sister Sledge, James Brown, Bob Marley, and Parliament Funkadelic.
arrow iconRead More
1980
  • In 1981, Percy Sutton’s Inner City Broadcasting Corporation and a group of private investors purchase The Apollo Theater. The Apollo receives state and city landmark status as Harlem’s oldest functioning theater in 1983.
  • On May 5th, 1985, The Apollo’s renovation is celebrated with a 50th Anniversary grand reopening and television special, “Motown Salutes The Apollo.” Amateur Night is re-launched on Christmas Eve that same year.
  • “Showtime at The Apollo” is revived and launched as a television show.
arrow iconRead More
1990
  • The Apollo Theater Foundation, Inc., a not-for-profit organization, is established to manage, fund, and program The Apollo Theater.
  • The Artist Formerly Known as Prince plays The Apollo in an exclusive VH1 Concert.
  • The Apollo Theater Foundation launches its first performance series with a tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Other performances follow including Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, Boys Choir of Harlem, and Betty Carter – Jazz Ahead ’95.
  • Tony Bennett plays a sold-out engagement honoring Billie Holiday.
arrow iconRead More
2000
  • In 2002, George C. Wolfe’s new musical “Harlem Song” opens to enthusiastic reception.
  • The Apollo hosts its inaugural Spring Benefit Gala in 2005 with a special tribute to Ossie Davis.
  • The first phase of renovation is completed and includes the installation of over 1,500 house seats, restoration of the 125th-Street façade, a state-of-the-art marquee, new stage, and greenroom.
  • In 2006, Apollo legend James Brown lays in state on The Apollo stage. Tens of thousands of people gather to pay their respects.
  • Then-Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama hosts a campaign fundraiser at The Apollo in 2007.
  • Thousands of Michael Jackson fans flock to The Apollo Theater to pay tribute to the pop icon, celebrate his life, and mourn his death in 2009.
arrow iconRead More
arrow leftarrow right

LEADERSHIP

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
New York
Michelle Ebanks
President & CEO
Executive
New York
Kamilah Forbes
Executive Producer
Executive
New York
Aldo Scrofani
Chief Operating Officer
Executive
New York
Kelly McKaig
Senior Director of Finance
Sr. Directors
New York
Laura Greer
Senior Producer
Sr. Directors
New York
Leatrice Ellzy
Senior Director of Programming
Sr. Directors
New York
Bronson Van Wyck
President
Van Wyck & Van Wyck
Board of Directors
New York
Carlos Whitaker
Senior Managing Director
Blackstone Credit
Board of Directors
New York
Q McKenney
Senior Director of Theater Operation
Sr. Directors
New York
Shannon McPhee
Senior Director of Development
Sr. Directors
New York
Charles Philips
Chairman - Managing Partner and Co-Founder
RECOGNIZE
Board of Directors
New York
Richard D. Parsons
Chairman Emeritus - Senior Advisor
Providence Equity Partners, LLC
Board of Directors
New York
Ronald O. Perelman
Vice Chairman - Chief Executive Officer
MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings Inc.
Board of Directors
New York
Patricia M. Zollar
Vice Chairman - Managing Director
Neuberger Berman
Board of Directors
New York
Willie E. Woods
Treasurer - President
ICV Capital Partners, LLC
Board of Directors
New York
Daisey M. Holmes
Secretary - President, BNY Mellon Foundation
BNY Mellon
Board of Directors
New York
Andre Branch
Senior Vice President, General Manager
MAC Cosmetics
Board of Directors
New York
Tina R. Davis
Managing Director of Brand Visual Design, Content and Experience
Citi
Board of Directors
New York
Michelle Gadsden-Williams
Managing Director & Global Head of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
BlackRock
Board of Directors
New York
Aaron Holiday
Co-Founder and Managing Partner
645 Ventures
Board of Directors
New York
Derek Jones
Managing Director, Private Equity Investments
GCM Grosvenor
Board of Directors
New York
Kwanza Jones
Founder & CEO
SUPERCHARGED
Sr. Directors
New York
Lou D’Ambrosio
Partner
Goldman Sachs
Board of Directors
New York
Kevin Morrison
Chairman, Investment Banking
Bank of America
Board of Directors
New York
Racquel Oden
Managing Director, Head of National Sales
HSBC
Board of Directors
New York
Karen L. Pavlin
Chief Equity and Inclusion Officer
ServiceNow
Board of Directors
New York
JoAnn H. Price
Founding Partner & President
Fairview Capital Partners, Inc.
Board of Directors
New York
Howard Schiffman
Partner
Schulte Roth & Zabel
Board of Directors
New York
Dawanna Williams
Real Estate Developer
Dabar Development Partners
Board of Directors
New York
Pharrell Williams
Artist
i am OTHER Entertainment
Board of Directors
New York
Mark Getachew
Partner
Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP
Board of Directors
New York
Robert K. Kraft
Founder, Chairman, and CEO
The Kraft Group
Board of Directors
New York
Carolyn Minick Mason
Independent Fundraising and Development
Consultant
Board of Directors
New York
Nat Zilkha
Co-Founder & Executive Chairman
Firebird Music
Board of Directors
New York
Kwanza Jones
President & Founder
SUPERCHARGED
Board of Directors
New York
Quincy Jones
Director Emeritus
Quincy Jones Productions, Inc
Board of Directors
New York
Leslie M. Uggams
Director Emeritus
Actress and Singer
Board of Directors
View Previous Letters
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Michelle Ebanks
President & CEO

President Statement

Dear Apollo Family,

As I write this, I am filled with gratitude, excitement, and a deep sense of honor to be a part of this transformative moment with The Apollo.

Six months into my role, I’m consistently moved by our rich history and the steadfast commitment of our incredible team. The collective efforts of my predecessor Jonelle Procope, the Board of Directors, staff, artists, and our beloved audiences have propelled us to new heights, surpassing significant milestones in our capital campaign and setting the stage for our next chapter.

Our mission is clear: to be the epicenter of Black culture, embracing both emerging talents and established legends, supporting artists at every stage of their career. The Apollo Stages at The Victoria, opening this February, will allow us to continue building upon that mission. This is not just a physical expansion, but an expansion of what’s possible—and of the myriad of ways The Apollo might foster artistic expression, inclusivity, and community engagement.

As we conclude this momentous year and prepare to celebrate The Apollo’s 90th anniversary, our commitment extends far beyond the stage. We are dedicated to deepening our roots in the community and expanding our role as a civic and economic cornerstone of Harlem, providing a space for critical conversations, and serving as a cultural leader within New York City and the global community. The enduring spirit and dedication to excellence at The Apollo will propel us into an exhilarating new chapter where culture takes shape.

Your generous, ongoing support enables The Apollo to amplify our impact and adapt to the changing needs of Harlem and the greater cultural community. With your help, we can continue to innovate and expand, providing the experiences that audiences, students, and educators have come to expect. If you are able, please consider supporting The Apollo here or be amongst the first to make The Apollo Stages at The Victoria a part of your legacy with a signature seat here. I look forward to seeing you at The Apollo soon.

Warm regards,
Michelle Ebanks
President & CEO
The Apollo

Dec. 2023
Kamilah Forbes
Executive Producer

Artistic Statement

THE NEXT MOVEMENT

Dear Apollo Family,

Over the past several years, our lives have changed in many ways. Faced with a range of challenges, we forged new paths, tried new things, and found new ways to move forward. I am proud to be part of a historic institution that has always met the challenge of advancing our culture forward. The Apollo has built a dynamic platform for the elevation of Black voices and creativity through inspired innovation and a commitment to artistic excellence—forging a powerful legacy of forward movement. This fall we celebrate that ongoing tradition and look to the future with a season titled The Next Movement.  

The Next Movement’s vibrant programming is led by trailblazing Black artists and thought leaders. Camille A. Brown and Dancers continue our commitment to dance culture with ink, part of Brown’s canon-building movement trilogy celebrating self-empowerment and resilience—now presented in full for the first time, in partnership with the Joyce Theater and featuring Brown’s final performances as a dancer in this repertory.

Tomorrow, we launch our Arts & Ideas series, its mission is providing resonant access to groundbreaking thinkers and cultural figures. The series kicks off with fashion industry icon Edward Enninful, who, in advance of his coming memoir A Visible Man, discusses his unprecedented career path and role as a champion of inclusivity with renowned Academy Award-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o.  Later in the season, and in recognition of the upcoming 50th anniversary of Hip Hop, multi-platinum artist, philanthropist, and South Bronx native Fat Joe will share intimate stories from his new memoir, The Book of Jose.

Moving forward in our mission to amplify Africa’s rich influence on worldwide contemporary culture, next month Malian musician Oumou Sangaré, in partnership with World Music Institute, makes her Apollo debut—and a rare U.S. appearance—in a one-night-only performance.

Nothing speaks more meaningfully to forward movement than broadening the experiences of young people. Our School Day Live program this fall looks at the origins and history of the blues, with a live orchestra, and following a two-year hiatus, our teaching artists return to meet NYC students in their schools.  Because learning is a lifelong process, we invite educators and the public to workshops led by Camille A. Brown & Dancers, and as part of the Apollo’s Live Wire series, we’ll take a deep dive into Hip Hop Style with local choreographers and the Fashion Institute of Technology.

We invite you to discover or revisit Apollo favorites including Amateur Night at the Apollo, the incubator of major talent and one of America’s longest-running events; the Kwanzaa:Regeneration Celebration featuring Abdel R. Salaam’s Forces of Nature Dance Theatre; the Apollo Music Café; Comedy Club; and community events for all ages.

Our three-year Master Artist in Residence program, inaugurated with Ta-Nehisi Coates and now in its second iteration, supports the creation of new artistic and civic works moving us all towards a diverse 21st century American performing arts canon. The program continues with current resident, Grammy and Emmy-nominated musician/producer Kamasi Washington.

Speaking of next movement, The Apollo will soon expand, welcoming audiences to an exciting new space just down the street. The Apollo’s Victoria, a renovated former movie and vaudeville house, will house two new black-box theaters for a range of Apollo programs, add administrative offices, and offer subsidized rental opportunities for community and non-profit arts organizations. Like all New Yorkers, we couldn’t be happier to have more space!

The Apollo is always in motion, offering illuminating and joyful experiences that center and amplify Black voices. We invite you to experience The Next Movement and join us on our amazing journey forward!

Kamilah Forbes
Executive Producer

Dec. 2023
Kamilah Forbes
Executive Producer

Artistic Statement

THE RENAISSANCE IS NOW

We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves.”  The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, Langston Hughes

I believe that history is cyclical.  Like the Harlem Renaissance – which emerged out of the darkness of an authoritarian leadership regime, a major migration that dramatically impacted the demographics of who we are as America, and a global health pandemic – this moment in time again stands as a turning point for a new revival of artistic, creative, and innovative expression that has been inspired by the truths exposed in the wake of our current pandemics.

For the past few months, I have been inspired and motivated by the work and words of critically acclaimed dramaturg, director, historian and Apollo New Works artist Talvin Wilks, who shared:

Does a movement exist if there is no one to write about it, to document it, to claim it? The genius of Alain Locke and W.E.B. Du Bois and the impact of Crisis Magazine and Opportunity curated one of the greatest foundations of beauty, art, and propaganda. Let us remind ourselves that the anti-Black machinery in this nation was profound – restrictions on voting to the defense of lynchings – all happening at the same time as the Harlem Renaissance. It is against this backdrop that the Harlem Renaissance rises and flourishes, forged by the firebrand of Marcus Garvey, infused by the spirituality of Father Divine, instigated by the marching syncopation of Major James Reese Europe and the Harlem Hellfighters Band (369th Infantry Regiment), the beat of the Tom Tom, the Blues of Bessie Smith, Swing at the Savoy, The Duke at the Cotton Club, and the voices of Ida B. Wells and the anti-lynching movement. 

What we learn from the Harlem Renaissance is that revolution has to be curated, it doesn’t just happen. It is conjured, believed, doubted, debated. It is established and elusive. As we mark nearly 100 years since the start of this historic era, we know that without it the very foundation upon which we stand would be sinking sand. The Harlem Renaissance serves as a significant moment of collective witnessing, collective contemplation, and collective action holding firm the tradition of celebrating Blackness. It is an essential anchorage, an essential movement in a long lineage of many movements, setting the stage for the Black Arts Movement, the Hip Hop Movement, and the Afrofuturistic movement. We hold this era in the highest esteem, in all of its contradictions and triumphs.

Thank you, Talvin, for those deep and powerful words and connections that I hope resonate with you as much as they resonated with me.

And so, it is at this intersection of artistry and activism that The Apollo responds with a season of signature programs, audience favorites, and a preview of the first of a series of commissioned projects and new works by artists who are pushing the boundaries of their artforms while expanding the cannon of African American works.  We embrace the notion of our duty as artists, to lead, to reflect, and to respond. As much as this is a motion of growth and resurgence, it is also a moment of healing and reflection.  After 19 months of physical and emotional isolation, it is artists who will lead the way – a path to begin to feel again with the fullness of our unspoken humanity.

As we continue to welcome you back to the theater or engage with us digitally, we believe we are entering a new renaissance – an era that will propel the next century with extraordinary breath of cultural creativity. That is why we are thrilled to launch our fall season, “The Renaissance is Now,” which serves as a reminder that The Apollo has long been a hub of Black creativity, expression, and artistry and continues to be a trailblazer as we reimagine our future in pushing the culture forward and beyond.

– Kamilah Forbes

Dec. 2023
Kamilah Forbes
Executive Producer

Artistic Statement

If the past twelve months have shown us anything, it is the importance of making the most of the present, making our voices heard, and leaving a legacy that we as individuals and a as community can be proud of. It is in this vein that I introduce The Apollo’s all digital Spring season line up of film, festivals, music, comedy, and more.

Our work this season is centered around what it means to be Black and alive. In a society where we’ve been forced to affirm our humanity through rallying cries like Black Lives Matter, we celebrate the joy and historical legacy of The Apollo, while marking our presence in the social and cultural commentary of today’s society. We’re shifting the narrative from reverence to relevance. We honor the ritual and tradition of the past as we chart a path forward with our incredible roster of artists and audiences into the unknown. The works presented this season not only ask questions, but answer questions about who we are and want to be as Black people in America.

The performing arts are critical to our connection to one another and extending our work into the digital space offers an invitation to connect a global audience across time and space. Whether it be through our WOW – Women of the World Festival Festival, featuring brilliant women across the world, or giving us a glimpse back in time as we celebrate hip hop culture of the 80s and 90s with 30 years of House Party. We also continue to amplify and highlight the brightest among us through our Apollo Late Nights, Apollo Film series and Apollo Theater education programs. No matter where you are in the world, we welcome you to experience the magic of The Apollo.

Even virtually, the theater has unwaveringly remained a home and landing place for Black culture, innovation and truth telling. This moment is no different. Through all of the works this season and beyond, we seek to explore the myriad of individual identities that make up Black culture and how these identities come together to create a collective. Through each event we present, we acknowledge where we’ve been—and continue to— chart a path for where we plan to go. It is our goal to serve as a beacon of Black creativity and excellence.

It is from this space that artists, audiences, young people and our global communities will see themselves powerfully reflected in the works we present on our Digital Stage and know that……we are here… we are important…. we are a force… and we are the shape of things to come.

I look forward to continuing the journey with you and seeing you on the Apollo Digital Stage!

– Kamilah Forbes

Dec. 2023
programs
The Apollo's artistic vision is grounded in the celebration and development of Black culture and creativity. Programs re-envision The Apollo’s legacy in forward-looking and contemporary ways, create forums for emerging artists and curators, support mid-career and established artists, develop and present new and cutting-edge multi-disciplinary work, uplift culturally diverse artists and audiences, and create an intimate and engaged experience for audiences.

Our Education program

Engaging students, young creatives, and educators through the legacy of The Apollo and the power of the performing arts.

community resources

Amateur Night’s history begins with Ralph Cooper, an actor and producer, who started the original Harlem Amateur Hour in April 1933 at Frank Schiffman’s Lafayette Theater. In 1934, Cooper began the Wednesday Amateur Night at Sidney Cohen and Morris Sussman’s 125th Street Apollo Theatre. Cooper’s Amateur Night in Harlem radio shows were broadcast live from the Apollo over WMCA and carried...
TODAY
Jun 19
| 7:30PM EDT
Jun 19
-
Jun 19
AMATEUR NIGHT: SEMI-FINAL
Apollo's Historic Theater
AMATEUR NIGHT: SEMI-FINAL

The competition heats up as winners from the first round of Amateur Night return for a chance to advance one step closer to the $20,000 grand prize. Known as one of New York’s most popular live entertainment experiences, Amateur Night at The Apollo attracts performers and audiences from around the world in a classic talent competition that has launched the careers of countless legendary artists, from Ella Fitzgerald, Luther Vandross, Lauryn Hill, H.E.R, Machine Gun Kelly and Jazmine Sullivan.

Join the notoriously “tough” audience in an interactive evening unlike any other and lend your voice to decide who will “Be Good or Be Gone!” to win the triumphant grand prize.

Amateur Night at The Apollo sponsored by Coca-Cola, is hosted by the comedian Capone. Each show begins with a festive pre-party featuring video and music by DJ Jess. Keep a lookout for C.P. Lacey, the resident Executioner who sweeps bad talent off the stage!

Jun 26
| 7:30PM EDT
Jun 26
-
Jun 26
AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO GRAND FINALE
Apollo's Historic Theater
AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO GRAND FINALE

This is the Amateur Night show you’ve been waiting for! Winners from the Semi-Finals return in this final competition for the title of Child Star of Tomorrow earning $5,000 while the Grand Finale winner receives $20,000. The talented performers return for one last chance to leave it all on the line with hopes of becoming the next Ella Fitzgerald, Luther Vandross, Lauryn Hill, H.E.R, Machine Gun Kelly or Jazmine Sullivan.Audiences have casted their vote to get them this far, but in the Grand Finale, you decide who will Be Good or Be Gone and win the triumphant grand prize. Don’t miss the final Amateur Night sponsored by Coca-Cola performance of the season hosted by the comedian Capone with a festive pre-party with DJ Jess and Set It Off Man Greginald Spencer.

Jun 29
| 8:00PM EDT
Jun 29
-
Jun 29
Smokey Robinson
Apollo's Historic Theater
Smokey Robinson

Apollo Legend Smokey Robinson returns to The Apollo’s historic stage for the first time in almost 10 years for a night of soulful hits from his legendary discography including recent hits from his new album— GASMS. Provider of the soundtrack to our lives, GRAMMY® Living Legend — Smokey Robinson will give us a thrilling night to remember!

Support The Apollo

Access Exclusive Benefits

Celebrate the past, present, and future of Black art and creativity. Your generosity enables The Apollo to fulfill its mission and sustain its legacy of excellence.

Jobs at the Apollo

Join our team at the world-famous Apollo! Learn more about job opportunities and how to apply.
Thank you to our Season Sponsors
2023 / 2024
Coca-ColaFord FoundationCoca-ColaFord Foundation